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Investment of Check-Off Funds

WGRF invests the funds collected through the wheat and barley check-offs into wheat and barley variety development. Through partnerships with university crop development centres and Government research facilities, WGRF ensures producers have direct input into setting the wheat and barley breeding objectives and priorities. Investments from check-off funds create a partnership between farmers and researchers. WGRF invests, on average, over $6 million each year in wheat and barley breeding research.

WGRF has assisted in the development and release of more than 200 new wheat and barley varieties over the past decade and a half, many of which are today seeded to large portions of the cropland in Western Canada. Cultivars are widely tested across western Canada to ensure adaptation to drought, heat, weather damage and diseases such as rust, common bunt, Fusarium Head Blight, leaf spots, and loose smut, and insects such as Orange Wheat Blossom midge and wheat stem sawfly. 

Wheat $1 of Check-off = $20.40 Producer Value

Barley $1 of Check-off = $7.56 Producer Value

A recent return on investment study commissioned by the WGRF has estimated that investment in wheat and barley varietal research is providing producers with a very high return on their investment. This study calculates that on average every producer check-off dollar invested into wheat varietal research has returned $20.40 in value to the producer. Barley varietal research saw a return of over $7.56 for each producer dollar invested.

The value is realized when new wheat and barley varieties are released and adopted by producers in Western Canada. For example, new WGRF supported varieties like Carberry, Muchmore, CDC Verona and all of the midge tolerant wheat’s are higher yielding with improved disease and pest resistance. Through WGRF farmers have assisted in the development and release of more than 200 new wheat and barley varieties over the past decade and a half, many of which are today seeded to large portions of the cropland in Western Canada.

$94 Million invested